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Sea Wall Upgrade Protects Coastal Assets At Shortland’s Bluff

28 April 2015

Crucial works to repair and rebuild a sea wall at Shortland’s Bluff will help prevent coastal erosion caused by storm surges and protect navigational aids at Queenscliff.

The $150,000 works managed by the Victorian Government were completed prior to Easter and will help defend the seawall and coastal assets before the onset of powerful winter swells.

The recent works will also assist in safe passage for boats and ships entering Port Phillip Bay Heads at ‘The Rip’ – among the most hazardous tidal port approaches in the world.

The project is part of significant coastal repair works underway at beaches around the region this year at Point Richards, Shortland’s Bluff and Point Lonsdale.

Following the storms last year, significant scouring was reported at the toe of the sea wall, with erosion behind the wall causing it to slump, crack and become unsafe.

The repair works commenced in early February 2015, and involved repairs to steps and rebuilding a 20-metre section of wall.

The works are part of a package of $300,000 being invested into coastal infrastructure management from the Victorian Government’s Coastal Environments Program into the Borough of Queenscliffe this financial year.

The Borough of Queenscliffe partnered with the State Government by providing assistance for assessing tenders and supporting the delivery of the contract.

Quotes attributable to Minister for the Environment, Climate Change & Water, Lisa Neville

“Our coasts are vulnerable to many hazards, and it’s important that we undertake critical works like this to protect the coast and its users.”

The rebuild of this sea wall means the Port Phillip Heads Navigational aids and historical lighthouse will be better protected, preventing accidents and environmental disasters in our shipping channels.”

“These recent works are part of a package of $300,000 being invested into coastal infrastructure management from the Coastal Environments Program into the Borough of Queenscliffe this financial year.”

Quotes attributable to Mayor Helene Cameron, Borough of Queenscliffe:

“This project is a wonderful example of the strong partnership between the Borough of Queenscliffe and the State Government to protect our coastline.”

Key facts:

  • The waters of the narrow entrance to Port Phillip, known as ‘The Rip’ or ‘the Heads’, are recognised as being among the most hazardous in the world. Protecting navigational aids and other coastal assets around the bay is a high priority for the Andrews Government.
  • Statewide, the Department of Environment, Water, Land and Planning manages $600 million in coastal protection assets. Over $150 million of these assets, excluding sand renourishment works, are located within the Barwon South West region covering the Bellarine Peninsula, Surf Coast and Far South West.
  • A single bluestone block from the original seawall build sits on the beach about 10 metres in front of the new section of wall at Shortland's Bluff. The contractors had intended that this block would be used in the rebuild, however feedback from locals changed this plan. Residents commented they had watched the block slowly travelling up the beach over many years, starting its journey from the low tide mark, and that is now somewhat of an icon for locals. So the block has been left in-situ on the beach as a silent marker to time and tide.

Reviewed 19 August 2020

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