Pharmacist Chronic Disease Program Applications Open

The Andrews Labor Government is calling for expressions of interest from pharmacists and GPs to participate in the new Pharmacist Chronic Disease Management pilot program.

The pilot program will see pharmacists and GPs work closely together to help patients manage their chronic illnesses and medication.

Through the pilot, eligible patients will be able to visit their local pharmacist to monitor chronic conditions and manage medications under the direction of their GP’s care plan.

Chronic diseases place a significant burden on Victorian communities with more than half of all visits to GPs currently involving the management of at least one chronic condition.

Many of these visits involve renewing prescriptions or making dose adjustments, rather than diagnosing new conditions.

By expanding the role of pharmacists in collaboration with GPs, it will mean families have a new convenient option to access the healthcare they need, when they need it and close to home.

The 18 month pilot program will be implemented in one metropolitan and two rural locations.

Eligible locations have been identified as areas with an increased prevalence of chronic disease that would most benefit from the initiative.

Expressions of interest are now open until 24 February 2017.

Eligible pharmacies and general practices in the selected areas are invited to submit a joint expression of interest by completing the application form available www2.health.vic.gov.au/health-workforce/reform-and-innovation/pharmacist-chronic-disease-management

Quotes attributable to the Acting Minister for Health Jenny Mikakos

“We know pharmacists are trusted healthcare professionals and that our community pharmacies can provide a greater range of health services.”

“With more than 87 per cent of Victorians living with 2.5km of a pharmacy, this new pilot program will provide people with chronic diseases another convenient option to access the care and treatment they need.”

“By using the skills of our highly trained pharmacists to deliver primary care we’re helping take pressure off our hospitals and better meet the challenges of rising rates of chronic disease.”