John Cain Arena To Celebrate Legacy Of Great Victorian

One of Melbourne’s favourite sporting and entertainment venues will be renamed in honour of former Victorian Premier John Cain.

Premier Daniel Andrews today announced that Melbourne Arena would become John Cain Arena as a tribute to the man credited with helping create the Melbourne Park precinct and keeping the Australian Open in Victoria.

A State Memorial Service will be held for Mr Cain at St Paul’s Cathedral at 11am today, celebrating the former Premier’s life, legacy and dedication to public service.

As Premier, Mr Cain opened the National Tennis Centre – now Melbourne Park – after having been a driving force in its creation, enabling the Australian Open to flourish after it had outgrown the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Club.

The Australian Open, which wrapped up last night, has gone from strength to strength in the decades since, as the Melbourne and Olympic Parks precinct has continued to evolve as a world-leading sports and entertainment area.

Victorian governments have invested almost $1 billion in Melbourne Park since 2010 to enhance Melbourne Park for users, and as a result the Australian Open has been locked in for Victoria until at least 2036.

The rebadging of Melbourne Arena as John Cain Arena will occur in coming months and has been endorsed by Tennis Australia, which agreed to relinquish naming rights to the stadium.

Members of the public are encouraged to attend today’s State Memorial Service, with doors opening at 10am.

Mr Cain’s family has asked that people consider making a donation to support the Victorian Bushfire Appeal in lieu of floral tributes.

Quotes attributable to Premier Daniel Andrews

“John Cain made an enormous contribution to Victorian life and it’s particularly appropriate that we honour his legacy at Melbourne Park.”

People will see his name and know the story of a man who made our state a better place.”

Quote attributable to Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events Martin Pakula

The creation of Melbourne Park in the 1980s was a turning point in Melbourne’s development as a global city and John Cain’s leadership was a driving force.”