Deadly Questions Shifts Focus To Treaty

The second phase of the Deadly Questions campaign, launching this week, will focus on the important role of Treaty in Victoria and what Treaty could mean for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Victorians.

Campaign champions answer questions such as ‘What will a Treaty mean for all Victorians’ and ‘Why is self-determination important to Aboriginal people?’

The landmark campaign gives non-Aboriginal Victorians the opportunity to ask the questions they have always wanted to ask but may be too afraid or embarrassed to ask.

Digital, radio, print and billboard advertising focussing on Treaty related questions and answers, will be used throughout Victoria.

Since Deadly Questions launched in June, there have been over 2,600 questions asked.

One in six questions asked what they could do to support Aboriginal Victorians – and what exactly Aboriginal Victorians wanted from the Treaty process.

One in five asked specific questions about Aboriginal cultures and traditions like art, music and family structures. Victorians were also keen to use the platform to ask how to appropriately teach children more about Aboriginal culture and language.

The campaign is part of the Andrews Labor Government’s work to advance Aboriginal self-determination and Treaty.

Self-determination is an essential part of closing the gap – because Aboriginal Victorians know what is best for themselves, their children, their families and their communities.

Explore and ask your Deadly Question today at deadlyquestions.com.au and join the broader conversation with Aboriginal Victorians.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Natalie Hutchins

“The results of the campaign so far show the incredible interest Victorians have in the rich cultures and histories of Aboriginal people in Victoria.”

“While the Morrison Liberal Government cancels COAG and defers renewing the critical Close the Gap targets, the Andrews Labor Government is progressing self-determination.”

“I encourage Victorians to jump online, ask their own deadly questions and boost their understanding of Aboriginal culture in Victoria.”