Connecting Young Aboriginal Victorians To Culture

The Andrews Labor Government is giving Aboriginal young people more opportunities to strengthen their connections to culture through community-led mentorship programs.

Wayapa Wuurrk’s successful Warran Warran Maar mentoring program will receive $240,000 over two years, as part of $1.75 million in the Victorian Budget 2017/18 to support the Aboriginal Youth Mentoring Program.

Warran Warran Maar is a three-year program that helps Aboriginal boys aged 12 to 15 enter adulthood by embracing Aboriginal knowledge and culture, and values of respect, accountability and responsibility.

Attending the Warran Warran Maar graduation ceremony, Minister for Youth Affairs Jenny Mikakos also announced that funding will be provided to support new mentoring programs to be delivered in three additional locations.

The three new Aboriginal youth mentoring programs will run in:

  • Bairnsdale, delivered by Gippsland and East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-Operative
  • Swan Hill, by the Mallee District Aboriginal Services
  • South-Western Victoria, by Winda-Mara Aboriginal Corporation

The Koorie Youth Council will continue to help Aboriginal organisations to engage Aboriginal young people in the design and delivery of the new mentoring programs.

Youth Affairs Council of Victoria will also provide advice and support to ensure the programs meet the Australian National Mentoring Benchmarks.

Aboriginal youth mentoring programs aim to help Aboriginal young people reach their leadership potential, learn about culture and identity, and explore education, training and employment opportunities.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Youth Affairs Jenny Mikakos

“This is about giving young Aboriginal people the tools they need to build networks, set themselves up for the future, and reach their full potential.”

“The mentoring programs have a strong emphasis on connection to culture and community, which we know results in better outcomes for young Aboriginal people.”